Jump to content

Discord   |   Play games and chat with our PC gaming community in Discord.
Launch Discord  
Photo

Who Makes the Most Reliable Hard Drive?


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1
Naaackers

Naaackers

  • Member
  • OTS FPR TJE LODS

  • 6,903 posts

Original Article

 

As a storage whore, one of the questions I get asked the most is 'whats the best hard drive'? And while most answers you'll get from people are anecdotal, I like to refer to the fact in order to give you the best answer. 

In the years leading up to 2015, Seagate drives were failing the most often out of all of the brands. I had so many Seagate drive die over and over again until I swore to never buy them again. In 2015, many reports showed that 1 of every 10 hard drives shipped failed within the first year. There is a limit to the amount of data you can lose before you vow never to buy a hard drive again. 

As of 2013-2015, I was buying strictly Western Digital and HGST (owned/subsidized by WD, aka Hitachi Global Storage Technologies) drives because of their stability, reliability and great anecdotal track record. To this day, I only have had 2 Western Digital drives die on me. Both of which were taken used out of water damaged laptops. 

The statistics and survey written in this article were taken from a company called Backblaze. Basically, they are a storage whore of a company, and go through drives like candy. They are being awesome and sharing their info with us. 

 

Amazingly, Seagate has dropped it's 10%+ failure rate down to 3%. Very impressive. They have actually dropped their failure rate below both Toshiba and Western Digital. However, it's still not better than HGST's <1% failure rate. 

So what do you think Nackers? 

 

When it comes to 3.5" mechanical hard drives for personal use, I will be continuing to buy Western Digital and HGST drives for myself. I will wait to see the 2016 hard drive survey after the year comes to a close to consider buying Seagate again. Personally, I've seen just as many Toshiba drives fail as I have Seagate, so I wont use them either. But on even a more simple note, All of my data at home is double backed up. When a drive dies, I pull it, replace it and move on with no data loss. So in the end, whatever drive is cheapest at the time is the one I will buy (between WD and HGST). 

A good thing to take away from this survey is that hard drive manufactures across the board are making better hard drives, and the failure rate is dropping. However, I think we'll see solid state hard drives as mainstream primary drives for computers in the next 5 years.  

So, if you're going to buy hard drives - keep this stuff in mind. 



#2
DarkerBlitz

DarkerBlitz

  • Forum Member
  • 1,114 posts

Good writup, Nackers!

 

Also, don't just go by each brand's failure rates, look at the failure rates of the specific drive you need. For example, WD Black drives tend to be more Reliable than their Blue drives. Do your homework, get what is best for you, even if it means spending $10-20 more.

 

I'm starting my research over right now because I need a new HDD for my Drobo, and it's been ~a year since I bought anything. I always read the most recent reviews on each drive I'm considering.



#3
DigitalFlex

DigitalFlex
  • Member
  • 70 posts

Me and darker were just talking about this. I said the same thing next 5 years ssd's are in and platter drives are out.



#4
M2THE49

M2THE49

  • Retired
  • 5,410 posts

WD Blacks are my choice for recording drives (for massive simultaneous reading and writing) and WD blue to keep as backups

 

not to mention that generous 5 year warranty



#5
Paronity

Paronity

  • Forum Member
  • var Paronity = new Guru();

  • 16,885 posts

WD Blacks are my choice for recording drives (for massive simultaneous reading and writing) and WD blue to keep as backups

 

not to mention that generous 5 year warranty

^^ This. This is pretty much spot on with what I would do as well. 



#6
Stormborn

Stormborn
  • Retired
  • 394 posts
When the SSDs start outpacing traditional spinning discs at a price we can all afford, there will be another explosion of storage capacity and use. For example, you can buy a 3.8TB or 16TB Samsung SSD right now....if you had a ton of money to waste. When those come down to earthly prices, I'll be replacing all my mechanical drives




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users